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Bad owners give dog breeds a bad name


It's been truly saddening to witness the hate and vitriol from people regarding a recent incident in St. John's involving a greyhound and a chow chow dog.

Let's make the clear distinction that dog breeds do not have an inherent behaviour one way or another; they can all be trained, and whether that is trained properly or poorly is completely at the discretion of the owner.
A greyhound, a large dog that is mainly used for races and has also been used for hunting small game in the southern states, has the full capacity to harm another dog or human. Similarly, the chow chow, clearly more of a hefty breed, has the size to do significant damage.
The difference is what kind of stopping power each dog breed has and the damage it can do when it is trained poorly, or on the off chance a seemingly well-trained animal lashes out. When a Shih Tzu bites your hand, at worst you have a nasty cut, but if a Rottweiler bites your hand, well, you no longer have a hand.
Big dogs are more of a challenge to train simply from the fact that you have to ensure that they are trained properly as to not have outbursts, and are generally well behaved in public. The sheer time that an owner has to put into their animal, whatever the breed, is substantial, and many dog ownerswill forego this necessity, regardless of their breed.
Sadly, there are far too many dog owners who purchase large breed dogs to show off, or be a tough guy (or gal). And that is wrong. It leads to the dog having social issues, and inevitably, is an attack waiting to happen. Whether it's against another dog or a person, teeth will be bared.
The only thing that happens when people don't take the time to train their dogs properly is that after another animal or person is attacked and maimed, the attacking dog gets euthanized and the victim potentially has life altering injuries.
It's not fair to the large breed dogs that are well behaved, love and protect their families, and enjoy being around other people and dogs outdoors. They get tarred and feathered with the same brush because an irresponsible owner didn't take the time to do their job.
For those of us who do have an attraction to large breed dogs, we take the time to make sure that our pet, our furry member of our family, our companion, is going to do well.
At the end of the day, with any hope, the greyhound will recover, and the owners of the chow chow will take financial responsibility for the actions of their dog.
And when those of us who do not care for large breed dogs show no discretion in calling for their ban or complete euthanization of the breed, please remember, all dogs are made for people, but not all people are made for dogs.

Noah Davis-Power
St. John's

Let's make the clear distinction that dog breeds do not have an inherent behaviour one way or another; they can all be trained, and whether that is trained properly or poorly is completely at the discretion of the owner.
A greyhound, a large dog that is mainly used for races and has also been used for hunting small game in the southern states, has the full capacity to harm another dog or human. Similarly, the chow chow, clearly more of a hefty breed, has the size to do significant damage.
The difference is what kind of stopping power each dog breed has and the damage it can do when it is trained poorly, or on the off chance a seemingly well-trained animal lashes out. When a Shih Tzu bites your hand, at worst you have a nasty cut, but if a Rottweiler bites your hand, well, you no longer have a hand.
Big dogs are more of a challenge to train simply from the fact that you have to ensure that they are trained properly as to not have outbursts, and are generally well behaved in public. The sheer time that an owner has to put into their animal, whatever the breed, is substantial, and many dog ownerswill forego this necessity, regardless of their breed.
Sadly, there are far too many dog owners who purchase large breed dogs to show off, or be a tough guy (or gal). And that is wrong. It leads to the dog having social issues, and inevitably, is an attack waiting to happen. Whether it's against another dog or a person, teeth will be bared.
The only thing that happens when people don't take the time to train their dogs properly is that after another animal or person is attacked and maimed, the attacking dog gets euthanized and the victim potentially has life altering injuries.
It's not fair to the large breed dogs that are well behaved, love and protect their families, and enjoy being around other people and dogs outdoors. They get tarred and feathered with the same brush because an irresponsible owner didn't take the time to do their job.
For those of us who do have an attraction to large breed dogs, we take the time to make sure that our pet, our furry member of our family, our companion, is going to do well.
At the end of the day, with any hope, the greyhound will recover, and the owners of the chow chow will take financial responsibility for the actions of their dog.
And when those of us who do not care for large breed dogs show no discretion in calling for their ban or complete euthanization of the breed, please remember, all dogs are made for people, but not all people are made for dogs.

Noah Davis-Power
St. John's

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