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Memories of Resettlement theme of quilt show


A special quilt was unveiled Saturday at a quilt show in Arnold's Cove.

It was a project that took as much passion and skill, as it did time.

From pink lace in the tiny windows, to folds of linen that make up the clapboard siding of saltbox houses; there’s no doubt  the Resettlement Quilt will retell the memories of its creators for years to come.

Related story:

Stories of resettlement: Arnold’s Cove launches a year of commemoration

Following eight months of handiwork, the Foggy Bays Quilters Guild revealed it to the public on Saturday, at Tricentia Academy in Arnold’s Cove.

It was part of the Island Treasures Quilt Show, which welcomed visitors to an exhibition of 140 quilted blankets and crafts created by the guild.

All sixteen members hand-stitched a piece of their family and community history into the Resettlement Quilt.

For Rita Power, this brought back a flood of memories of her upbringing in Little Harbour West, one of the many relocated outports of Placentia Bay.

The 71-year-old created a scene showing three family homes. Some of the work involved staining bright-white fabric with coffee, to make a more realistic house colour.

“The block that I did has my own home on it that was resettled. It was moved to Rushoon in Placentia Bay, where it burned down after that,” described Power. “The yellow one, that was across from ours and it was my grandparents’, and I still remember them.

“The one that’s in the water belonged my aunt who had previously died, so her house was resettled. So it’s really personal.”

The landscaping technique used to create the emblem was new to Power, who has been quilting for 12 years.

“Landscaping, or that kind of quilting wasn’t my thing at all, but I was asked to do it, and it was a real personal thing for me, you know…it really brought back memories,” she said.

One of which was a particular body of water near their home.

“I had some of it done, but I didn’t have a little pond included in it, and my sister, she said, ‘it’s really nice, it really looks like it, but where’s the pond?’ And actually, I think at 18 months-old I fell in the pond, so the pond is obviously on the block now,” she laughed.

Power says she was in boarding school when much of the moving took place, as was the case for many schoolchildren in her area at the time. She was just graduating from teacher’s college in Littledale at time her parents moved.

Overall, she thinks resettlement gave her family more opportunity. Power currently resides in Southern Harbour.

“I have 10 siblings and all of them made a good adjustment,” said Power “And while there were eight or nine younger than me, they all had had opportunities they probably wouldn’t have had if they didn’t move.”

The Resettlement Quilt will eventually have a permanent display in one of the public buildings in Arnold’s Cove, giving others a colourful glimpse of local history.

Power says all the quilters had an emotional connection to the project.

“You really connect to your past and you relive everything that you’ve gone through,” she says. “It was a really nice idea.”

The Island Treasures Quilt Show was part the ‘Stories of Resettlement’ series of events in Arnold’s Cove, marking the 50-year anniversary of resettlement.

It was a project that took as much passion and skill, as it did time.

From pink lace in the tiny windows, to folds of linen that make up the clapboard siding of saltbox houses; there’s no doubt  the Resettlement Quilt will retell the memories of its creators for years to come.

Related story:

Stories of resettlement: Arnold’s Cove launches a year of commemoration

Following eight months of handiwork, the Foggy Bays Quilters Guild revealed it to the public on Saturday, at Tricentia Academy in Arnold’s Cove.

It was part of the Island Treasures Quilt Show, which welcomed visitors to an exhibition of 140 quilted blankets and crafts created by the guild.

All sixteen members hand-stitched a piece of their family and community history into the Resettlement Quilt.

For Rita Power, this brought back a flood of memories of her upbringing in Little Harbour West, one of the many relocated outports of Placentia Bay.

The 71-year-old created a scene showing three family homes. Some of the work involved staining bright-white fabric with coffee, to make a more realistic house colour.

“The block that I did has my own home on it that was resettled. It was moved to Rushoon in Placentia Bay, where it burned down after that,” described Power. “The yellow one, that was across from ours and it was my grandparents’, and I still remember them.

“The one that’s in the water belonged my aunt who had previously died, so her house was resettled. So it’s really personal.”

The landscaping technique used to create the emblem was new to Power, who has been quilting for 12 years.

“Landscaping, or that kind of quilting wasn’t my thing at all, but I was asked to do it, and it was a real personal thing for me, you know…it really brought back memories,” she said.

One of which was a particular body of water near their home.

“I had some of it done, but I didn’t have a little pond included in it, and my sister, she said, ‘it’s really nice, it really looks like it, but where’s the pond?’ And actually, I think at 18 months-old I fell in the pond, so the pond is obviously on the block now,” she laughed.

Power says she was in boarding school when much of the moving took place, as was the case for many schoolchildren in her area at the time. She was just graduating from teacher’s college in Littledale at time her parents moved.

Overall, she thinks resettlement gave her family more opportunity. Power currently resides in Southern Harbour.

“I have 10 siblings and all of them made a good adjustment,” said Power “And while there were eight or nine younger than me, they all had had opportunities they probably wouldn’t have had if they didn’t move.”

The Resettlement Quilt will eventually have a permanent display in one of the public buildings in Arnold’s Cove, giving others a colourful glimpse of local history.

Power says all the quilters had an emotional connection to the project.

“You really connect to your past and you relive everything that you’ve gone through,” she says. “It was a really nice idea.”

The Island Treasures Quilt Show was part the ‘Stories of Resettlement’ series of events in Arnold’s Cove, marking the 50-year anniversary of resettlement.

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