Kiewit looking to hire 80 for Marystown

Ashley
Ashley Fitzpatrick
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Higher pay for locals being promoted as Hebron work peaks

Kiewit Offshore Services is employing about 350 tradespeople in Marystown. Adding technicians, management and support personnel brings the count to about 480 people.

The Terra Nova floating production, storage and offloading vessel is pictured at the Peter Kiewit Offshore facility in Marystown. Kiewit is looking to hire 80 more people for work on the drilling support module. — File photo by Paul Herridge/The Southern Gazette

According to Kiewit spokesman Tom Janssen, the company is now looking at another 80 hires in short order, as work on the drilling support module for the $14-billion Hebron offshore oil platform begins to peak.

In attracting the workers needed, Kiewit and Unifor Local 20 can highlight a new memorandum of understanding (MOU), with changes in effect Jan. 16, providing higher rates of pay for workers living within a 120-kilometre radius of the worksite.

The agreement includes a shift premium and an overtime premium, Janssen confirmed in emailed responses to questions.

Exact dollar figures were not stated by the company or the union, but TC Media has reported, citing worker sources, employees living in the area are now receiving an extra $7 an hour atop regular pay and an incentive on time worked beyond eight hours on a weekend shift.

The negotiation of the MOU, in addition to the core contract, followed an end date on a similar, previous agreement.

 

Adding benefits

The boost for locals reflects a need for the company to address any local discontent, as they add more workers from outside the Burin Peninsula to meet the labour needs of the project.

Janssen did not state any existing differences in pay.

“The MOU allowed us to hire workers from outside the Marystown area which has become necessary because of the volume of work in the province and its effect on the supply of available labour. These workers and local workers have different scheduling preferences. The renegotiation of benefits took into account these differences,” he stated.

Local workers typically run shifts of five days on and two days off.

Workers coming from outside are being offered 14 days on, seven days off.

Kiewit has not brought in any temporary foreign workers for its piece of the offshore oil project, meaning differences in pay are related to workers on the Burin Peninsula versus other parts of the province and Canada.

Wayne Brake, president of Unifor Local 20, was reluctant to talk about the MOU.

“We’ve had some extra people brought in, and we’re just trying to get some wage parity with some of the b’ys they brought in,” he said, before redirecting questions.

 

Worker morale high

Brake was asked about the addition of so many workers at Kiewit’s Marystown operation in a short period and said the feeling at the site for all employees is generally positive, and much more positive than at times when there has been a lull in large-project work in the region.

“The morale is up, I’d say, 150 per cent,” he said.

“Hopefully they’ve got stuff lined up, so we don’t come down to this thing where we’ve got 600 people and then a year and a half’s time we have 10,” he said, adding he feels more work will come.

Work in Marystown on the drilling support module was expected to last about two years. First steel for the module was cut at the Kiewit Cow Head fabrication facility on May 14, 2013.

The drilling support module is one of two Hebron modules — large pieces of the topsides — being built in Newfoundland and Labrador. The other is the living quarters module, to be completed at Nalcor Energy’s Bull Arm Fabrication Site.

Also at Bull Arm, a Kiewit-Kvaerner Contractors joint venture is completing what will be the base of the Hebron offshore gravity base structure.

 

afitzpatrick@thetelegram.com

Organizations: Unifor Local 20, Nalcor Energy, Kiewit-Kvaerner Contractors

Geographic location: Marystown, Hebron, Canada Newfoundland and Labrador

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Comments

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Recent comments

  • Richard Coleman
    February 05, 2014 - 11:08

    How can I get work on on a off shore site like this one?

  • tom
    February 03, 2014 - 05:58

    Douglas stay in Alberta ..and have fun paying $10 a loaf of bread lol

    • shardar
      February 06, 2014 - 23:06

      Tom, I live and work in Alberta and let me tell ya', a loaf of bread doesn't cost $10. It's the same price as I paid when I lived on the welfare in NL.

    • shardar
      February 06, 2014 - 23:07

      Tom, I live and work in Alberta and let me tell ya', a loaf of bread doesn't cost $10. It's the same price as I paid when I lived on the welfare in NL.

    • sharon
      February 06, 2014 - 23:09

      Tom, I live and work in Alberta and let me tell ya', a loaf of bread doesn't cost $10. It's the same price as I paid when I lived on the welfare in NL.

  • Walter Wilson
    February 02, 2014 - 13:21

    Seeking employment as a crane operator

  • elaine bennett
    February 02, 2014 - 05:05

    hi how can i get in the union and how long would i have to wait to put my name in for this job,company! thank you

  • Douglas parrill
    February 01, 2014 - 12:33

    If kiewett would pay construction workers in nl parity wage like there workers in alberta , they would have no trouble to fill these jobs. I'm a crane operater here in alberta and I would be glad to work back home if they paid me the proper wage, not 30 an hour and here in alberta I'm getting 49 an hour. I don't need to go home that bad to starve, thank you

    • Jay
      February 02, 2014 - 17:11

      Douglas, You would starve while getting paid $30.00 an hour on the Burin ? That's incredible! With an attitude like that you should probably stay in Alberta.

  • william j bungay
    February 01, 2014 - 08:17

    What trades are they hiring for and how to contact them.

  • Corporate Psycho
    January 31, 2014 - 18:42

    There are a lot of locals who can't get work in Bull Arm because the unions won't let them in.

    • tundragoat
      February 17, 2014 - 09:37

      Ding Ding Ding !!!!!! We have a winner folks. This is exactly what is happening, we are bringing union members form atlantic canada, Quebec, and Ontario while other qualified fellow Newfoundlanders still have to travel to Alberta to work because some unions wont accept them. The unions dont want to be flooded with extra people when the work slows down.

  • john
    January 31, 2014 - 17:54

    how do i get a job out thier i am not in the union so how do i sign up

    • Dan
      March 30, 2014 - 12:27

      Why is it that Newfoundlanders don't want outsiders working in the province but, Newfoundlanders can go wherever they want for work. I am originally from NFLD and would love to come home. However I am told that Id best stay where I am because I will be ill treated and harassed. Locals want all the work for themselves. What if Alberta felt that way. Half the population of Fort McMurray is Newfoundlanders. A lot of them don't even live here, they commute, thus taking their dollars back east with them. Seems real selfish to me. Im as much a Newfoundlander as anyone living back home and should be able to come home and work without fear of harassment, I didn't get any harassment when I came to Alberta. Imagine the outcry from Newfoundlanders if Alberta told then to o home, no work here for outsiders. Newfoundlanders would raise the roof. There'd be an awful racket. But now they raise that same roof when people want to work in Newfoundland. Seems real selfish to me

    • Dan
      March 30, 2014 - 12:28

      Why is it that Newfoundlanders don't want outsiders working in the province but, Newfoundlanders can go wherever they want for work. I am originally from NFLD and would love to come home. However I am told that Id best stay where I am because I will be ill treated and harassed. Locals want all the work for themselves. What if Alberta felt that way. Half the population of Fort McMurray is Newfoundlanders. A lot of them don't even live here, they commute, thus taking their dollars back east with them. Seems real selfish to me. Im as much a Newfoundlander as anyone living back home and should be able to come home and work without fear of harassment, I didn't get any harassment when I came to Alberta. Imagine the outcry from Newfoundlanders if Alberta told then to o home, no work here for outsiders. Newfoundlanders would raise the roof. There'd be an awful racket. But now they raise that same roof when people want to work in Newfoundland. Seems real selfish to me